From the monthly archives:

October 2010

The data supply chain

October 27, 2010

Pete Warden has written a post on extracting value from data. Early on, he compares the data itself to raw minerals - it's difficult to sell it at a premium because the eventual buyer will have to invest time and money extracting value from the commodity. Now, data may not be commoditized (yet) but I […]

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World Statistics Day

October 21, 2010

World Statistics Day was yesterday, October 20th. Here's how the United States marked the occasion: In order to celebrate WSD, U.S. associations and federal statistical agencies will conduct a breakfast briefing and open house on Capitol Hill to celebrate the contributions of statistics toward informing public policy and improving human welfare. Party hats ON, people! If […]

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Why the Mac App Store is a brilliant idea

October 20, 2010

Apple announced this afternoon that the App Store is coming to Macs - a brilliant move on their part. When the iPad was announced, I speculated that it would imitate the Dashboard of Mac OS. Instead, it pursued a "single serving app" model, with great success. So great, in fact, that now the tables have […]

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Chaos and markets

October 20, 2010

This morning I came across a post by David Varadi on the (futile?) quest for simplicity. He writes: The most optimistic quantitative researcher knows deep down that an unexplained noise dominates the data that mysteriously eludes linear models such as regression. Markets are chaotic systems characterized by feedback. If they were neat and orderly (and […]

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Lightning does strike twice

October 20, 2010

Remember that Bulgarian lottery that happened in a bar that drew the same numbers in consecutive weeks? (TGR covered it extensively here and less extensively here.) Well, it turns out lightning does strike twice: the Israeli lottery had the same winning combinations come up just three weeks apart - though the numbers were drawn in a […]

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More on models

October 19, 2010

Justin Fox asks, "Why didn't people in finance pay attention to Benoit Mandelbrot?" -- and it's a great question. His conclusion: I think it’s mainly that he didn’t provide them a handy alternative to Black-Scholes. I can’t pretend to fully understand the practical implications of his fractal view of markets, but it does seem more […]

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Benoit Mandelbrot, 1924 - 2010

October 18, 2010

Benoit Mandelbrot had a greater academic impact on my life than perhaps any other person. I was deeply saddened to learn he had passed away. The NYT has prepared an obituary.

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The data science Venn diagram

October 14, 2010

Here's an infographic we can get behind -- Drew Conway's data science Venn diagram: Please take the time to read Drew's post on the subject (and his other ones) - they are excellent as always.

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Tower graphics

October 14, 2010

Max Gadney writes on the rise of "tower graphics" - those giant infographics popping up all over the net which require scrolling endlessly to follow their narratives. He notes: Every time I try to hate these, I imagine people who are just interested in the facts finding them easy to use. (albeit hard to search […]

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Statistical literacy

October 13, 2010

Wired has put together a list of 7 essential skills you didn't learn in college but will need to navigate the 21st century. Skill number 1: statistical literacy. (Skill number 7 is domestic tech -- could that be the new home ec?) (via Kottke)

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